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Start Date: January 2018
Funding: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE EERE)
Project Budget: $2,140,200
Principal Investigator(s): Dr. Anne Goodchild
Summary:
The UFL received $1.5 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy to help goods delivery drivers find parking with minimal circling around, time wasted, and increased congestion. With a coalition of public and private sector partners, researchers will integrate sensor technologies, develop data platforms to process large data streams, and publish a prototype app to let delivery drivers know when a parking space is open – and when it’s predicted to be open so they can plan to arrive when another truck is leaving. The UFL will also pilot test common carrier locker systems in public and private load/unload spaces near transit stops. This is a timely project as cities are looking for new strategies to accommodate the rapid growth of e-commerce.
Start Date: January 2019
Funding: U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T)
Project Budget: $500,000
Principal Investigator(s): Dr. Anne Goodchild
Other PI(s): Sam Wasser
Summary:
This project will develop and test innovative, non-invasive container screening methods in the new Supply Chain Defense Lab (SCDLab). The SCDLab research partnership brings the UFL's deep logistics expertise, global supply chain companies such as SSA Marine and Expeditors International of Washington, and the UW Center for Conservation Biology Forensic and Detection Dog Programs to solve global supply chain security problems that are priorities for U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).
Start Date: January 2020
Funding: U.S. Department of Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO)
Project Budget: $500,000
Principal Investigator(s): Dr. Anne GoodchildDr. Andisheh Ranjbari
Summary:
This project aims to develop a city-scale dynamic curb use simulation tool and an open-source curb management platform. The envisioned simulation and management capabilities will include dynamically and concurrently controlling price, number of spaces, allowed parking duration, time of use or reservation, and curb space use type (e.g., dynamic curb space rezoning based on supply and demand). Researchers will design, implement, and test a curbside resource usage platform for fleet vehicles communications at commercial vehicle load zones (CVLZs), passenger load zones (PLZs), and transit stops, and perform demonstrations with stakeholder agencies and provide pathways to practice for promising curb allocation policies.
Start Date: July 2023
Funding: National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP)
Project Budget: $450,000
Principal Investigator(s): Dr. Anne Goodchild
Partner(s): ECONorthwest (Lead), Citifi
Summary:
The Urban Freight Lab (UFL) at the University of Washington is partnering with ECONorthwest and Cityfi to develop a research product for the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) on the topic of revenue strategies for new mobility options. The team will analyze the public sector’s potential role in using revenue-related strategies to encourage or discourage new mobility options in personal mobility and goods delivery. The objective of this research is to develop a toolkit for transportation agencies that addresses how revenue-related strategies (e.g., taxes, fees, and subsidies) support policy objectives and shape the deployment of new mobility options. The toolkit can assist agencies to develop, evaluate, implement, and administer revenue-related strategies for new mobility options that transport people and goods.
Start Date: September 2015
Funding: Pacific Northwest Transportation Consortium (PacTrans)
Project Budget: $360,000
Summary:
The overarching goal of this project is to improve both cyclist safety and commercial parking utilization in urban environments. To support this goal, this project tested the impacts of different striping, signage, and infrastructure on cyclist behavior around commercial vehicle (truck) loading zones and will determine the implications for cyclist safety. While there is little research on the behavioral interaction between bicycle lanes and commercial vehicle loading zones (CVLZ) in the U.S., these interactions are important to understand, to preempt increasing conflicts between truckers and bicyclists. In this study, a bicycling simulator experiment examined bicycle and truck interactions completed by 48 participants. The bicycling simulator collected data regarding a participant's velocity and lateral position. Three independent variables reflecting common engineering approaches were included in this experiment: pavement marking, signage, and truck maneuvering.
Start Date: September 2023
Funding: U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) SMART (Strengthening Mobility and Revolutionizing Transportation) grant program
Project Budget: $350,000
Principal Investigator(s): Dr. Anne Goodchild
Partner(s): Seattle Department of Transportation (lead), Open Mobility Foundation
Summary:
The U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) awarded a new $2 million grant via its SMART (Strengthening Mobility and Revolutionizing Transportation) grant program to fund a collaboration between the Urban Freight Lab, Seattle Department of Transportation, and Open Mobility Foundation to fund curb space digitalization. This project will establish new commercial vehicle permit policies and pilot a digital permit. The aim is to reduce congestion, improve access to the curb, and promote more sustainable forms of urban delivery.
Start Date: February 2018
Funding: City of Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT), Pacific Northwest Transportation Consortium (PacTrans)
Project Budget: $310,000
Principal Investigator(s): Dr. Anne GoodchildDr. Ed McCormack
Summary:
The Urban Freight Lab conducted an alley inventory and truck load/unload occupancy study for the City of Seattle. Researchers collected data identifying the locations and infrastructure characteristics of alleys within Seattle's One Center City planning area, which includes the downtown, uptown, South Lake Union, Capitol Hill, and First Hill urban centers. The resulting alley database includes GIS coordinates for both ends of each alley, geometric and traffic attributes, and photos.
Start Date: January 2018
Funding: City of Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT)
Project Budget: $250,000
Principal Investigator(s): Dr. Anne Goodchild
Summary:
The City of Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) engaged the Urban Freight Lab to establish a baseline cordon truck and car count for the Greater Downtown area. This research will enable the city to understand much more about the economic sectors served by commercial vehicles that enter and leave the area. When this project is completed, SDOT will be the first major city department of transportation in the nation to develop a database that provides such detailed commercial vehicle use information.
Start Date: January 2017
Funding: City of Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT), Pacific Northwest Transportation Consortium (PacTrans)
Project Budget: $240,000
Principal Investigator(s): Dr. Anne Goodchild
Summary:
Part of the Final 50 Feet Research Program, this project contains: a curb occupancy study, a survey of First and Capitol Hill Loading Bays, a pilot test at Seattle Municipal Tower, and the development of a toolkit. Taken together with the Urban Freight Lab's earlier private infrastructure inventory (Seattle Center City Alley Infrastructure Inventory and Occupancy Study 2018) in Downtown Seattle, Uptown, and South Lake Union, this project finalizes the creation of a comprehensive Center City inventory of private loading/unloading infrastructure. The study also provides the city with on-the-ground data on the current use and operational capacity of the curb for commercial vehicles, documenting vehicle parking behavior in a three-by-three city block grid around each of five prototype Center City buildings: a hotel, a high-rise office building, an historical building, a retail center, and a residential tower. Researchers also tested a new urban goods delivery system strategy: Common Carrier Locker Systems. Tools used by the Urban Freight Lab are publicly available in an Urban Goods Delivery Toolkit, a one-stop-shop for planners to replicate this work in other cities.
Keywords:
Final 50 Feet
Start Date: October 2016
Funding: City of Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT)
Project Budget: $205,000
Principal Investigator(s): Dr. Anne Goodchild
Summary:
The Urban Freight Lab's first study provides the first assessment in any U.S. city of the privately-owned and operated elements of the Final 50 Feet of goods delivery supply chains, the final segment that includes private truck freight bays and loading docks, and delivery policies and operations within buildings, where drivers must locate both parking and the recipient. 
Start Date: January 2018
Funding: City of Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT), Amazon, Challenge Seattle
Project Budget: $200,000
Principal Investigator(s): Dr. Anne Goodchild
Summary:
The Supply Chain Transportation & Logistics Center and Seattle Department of Transportation worked in collaboration with employers, transit operators, and transportation network companies (TNCs) to test a variety of strategies to mitigate the traffic impacts of TNC pick-ups on the greater transportation network and improve safety for passengers and drivers. Strategies included increasing the number of passenger loading zones in high-traffic pick-up areas and geofenced pick-up or black-out areas.
Start Date: January 2020
Funding: Urban Freight Lab
Project Budget: $200,000
Principal Investigator(s): Dr. Anne Goodchild
Summary:
The Urban Freight Lab's Common Microhub project provides an opportunity for members to test and evaluate urban logistics strategies on the ground in Seattle's Uptown neighborhood. As third-party logistics companies enter the last-mile space and more cities commit to environmental focus and zero emission vision, the interest around creating logistics places in urban proximity is growing. The outcomes of this research can guide the development of future microhub implementations in other cities.
Start Date: January 2022
Funding: Urban Freight Lab
Project Budget: $180,000
Principal Investigator(s): Dr. Anne Goodchild
Summary:
The Urban Freight in 2030 project will explore emerging urban freight trends, their impacts on local and global sustainable development, and propose Urban Freight Lab’s future course of action. We'll use the expertise of the Urban Freight Lab members and partners, supported by up-to-date research and subject specialists, to create a shared vision of the future of urban delivery in 2030, and produce vision documents to be shared publicly, outlining and detailing the Urban Freight Lab’s vision of the future of urban freight. 
Start Date: January 2021
Funding: PacTrans (Region 10 University Transportation Center)
Project Budget: $180,000
Other PI(s): David Hurwitz (Oregon State University)
Summary:
This study will use a driving simulator to design a simulation experiment to test the behavior of commercial vehicle drivers under various parking and delivery situations and to analyze their reactions. The ability to modify the simulator’s environment will allow the researchers to relatively easily test a range of scenarios that correspond to different delivery and parking situations, such as changing road characteristics (land use, number of travel lanes, nearby signals, traffic in adjacent lanes), curb allocations (paid parking, commercial vehicle loading zones, passenger load zones), and other road users (passenger cars, ridehailing vehicles, bikes). In addition to monitoring behavior and decision-making, the simulator can also monitor distraction (through eye tracking) and the stress level of drivers (through galvanic skin response) when making these decisions and interacting with other road users. Analyzing parking decisions and driver stress levels based on roadway and driver characteristics will provide insights on travel behaviors and the parking decision-making process of commercial vehicle drivers, and will help city planners improve street designs and curb management policies to accommodate safe and efficient operations in a shared urban roadway environment. This study is intended to fill knowledge gaps and serve as a valuable resource for policy makers, transportation engineers, and urban planners.
Start Date: September 2019
Funding: PacTrans (Region 10 University Transportation Center)
Project Budget: $180,000
Principal Investigator(s): Dr. Anne GoodchildDr. Ed McCormack
Other PI(s): Kevin Chang
Summary:
This research aims to develop innovative methods for managing curb lane function and curb access. The rapid rise of autonomous vehicles (AV), on-demand transportation, and e-commerce goods deliveries, as well as increased cycling rates and transit use, is increasing demand for curb space resulting in competition between modes, failed goods deliveries, roadway and curbside congestion, and illegal parking.